Health

Managing Risk for Nurse Anesthetists

Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) provide important anesthesia care for many different types of surgeries and services. However, as they gain more and more autonomy, their risk for facing malpractice lawsuits increases as well.

“CRNAs practice with a high degree of autonomy, and they play a critical role in patient outcomes,” said Georgia Reiner, Risk Specialist, Nurses Service Organization (NSO). “This also makes them more vulnerable to a malpractice lawsuit if anything goes wrong.”

According to Reiner, although most states still require that CRNAs work under physicians’ supervision, some states — and the number is growing — are allowing them to practice independently. The good news is that, as Reiner said, CRNAs have been able to provide a lot more anesthesia care in more rural areas of the U.S. that otherwise wouldn’t be able to — such as obstetric, surgical, and trauma services. “CRNAs are also trained and qualified to treat pain patients. With the ongoing opioid epidemic in the U.S., and with millions of patients still suffering from chronic pain at the same time, the services CRNAs provide are essential to promoting safe and effective pain management,” explained Reiner.

As for the top risks that CRNAs face, Reiner said, “According to claim metrics from NSO’s underwriter, CNA, some of the top allegations made against CRNAs in malpractice lawsuits involve improper treatment or intervention during a procedure, medication errors, inadequacies in the anesthesia plan, and failure to monitor the patient’s condition. CRNAs encounter these liability risks on a daily basis, so it is important for them to identify and manage these risks to protect their career and livelihood while also improving outcomes for their patients.”

The NSO recently reviewed two case studies and then identified six ways that CRNAs can manage risks. They are as follows:

1. Maintain competencies (including experience, training, and skills)

Competencies should be consistent and up-to-date with the scope of authority granted by state law, the needs of the CRNA’s assigned patients, patient care unit, and equipment.

2. Obtain and document informed consent for any planned anesthetic intervention

Patients or the patients’ legal guardian must be informed of the potential risks, benefits, and alternatives to the planned anesthetic intervention and surgical procedure(s). CRNAs should verify that informed consent was obtained by a qualified member of the patient’s health care team and documented in the patient’s health care record prior to any intervention.

3. Document pertinent anesthesia-related information in the patient’s record

Review the patient’s clinical history, including relevant social and family history; evaluate the patient and determine if they are appropriate for anesthesia and the proper method of anesthesia. CRNAs should document this process, including their rationale, and any discussions with the patient.

4. Communicate in a timely and accurate manner initial and ongoing findings regarding the patient’s status and response to treatment

It is essential for CRNAs to report changes in the patient’s condition, any new symptoms displayed by the patient, or any patient concerns to the practitioner in charge of the patient’s care in a timely manner. Document patient responses to treatment, whether positive or negative.

5. Provide and document the practitioner notification of changes

In addition to communicating any change in the patient’s condition or symptoms, or any patient concerns, CRNAs also need to document the practitioner’s response and/or orders in the patient’s health care record.

6. Report any patient incident, injury, or adverse outcome

CRNAs should report any patient incident, injury, or adverse outcome, and the subsequent treatment and patient response to their organization’s risk management or legal department. If CRNAs carry their own professional liability insurance, they should alert their insurance carrier to any potential claims, as timely reporting ensures that an incident, if it develops into a covered claim and is not excluded for other reasons, will be covered.

“Facing a malpractice suit can be stressful and overwhelming because it is a long, unpredictable, and costly process. One step I recommend for CRNAs to take is maintaining their own professional liability insurance to help protect their careers,” said Reiner.

This story was originally published by Minority Nurse, a trusted source for nursing news and information and a portal for the latest jobs, scholarships, and books from Springer Publishing Company.

2019-02-17T10:00:00-0500


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