Food

The Surprising Health Benefits Of Cinnamon And Two Other Ancient“Superfoods”

…that you can probably find in your kitchen

Photo by Caglar Araz on Unsplash

Food can have healing powers while making our life more flavorful. Meet three ancient “superfoods” that are good for your health AND your taste buds.

“Cinnamon is a super-food that lowers cholesterol and is anti-cancerous”. Hannah Bronfman

Cinnamon is not only my favorite spice; I like it so much, I named my dog after it.

The usage of Cinnamon dates back to 2000 BC. It is made from the inner bark of trees from the Cinnamomum genus. There are two types of Cinnamon: Ceylon and Cassia.

The popular spice includes many health-boosting nutrients such as:

  • Calcium
  • Chromium
  • Copper
  • Iodine
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Zinc
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B2
  • Vitamin C

The health benefits of cinnamon

Cinnamon contains many phytochemicals, which have potent anti-inflammatory effects.

According to a study by the Department of Human Nutrition of the NWFP Agricultural University, the intake of 1–6 grams of cinnamon per day can reduce serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol and thus may be helpful in preventing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

The book “Prescription for Nutritional Healing” also suggests that Cinnamon might help with diarrhea, nausea, fungal infections, weight loss, and uterine hemorrhaging.

In Chinese Medicine, cinnamon is used to warm the body and thus help to fight colds and alleviate pain.

How can you bring more cinnamon into your life?

One easy way is to add cinnamon to hot drinks (coffee or tea). I also mix it in smoothies, protein shakes, and yogurt.

Unfortunately, the sugar content of cinnamon rolls will probably outweigh the health benefits of this “Super Spice. ”

You can also buy cinnamon supplements, but please consult with your doctor before taking adding them to your diet because cinnamon can decrease the effects of certain drugs and cause liver damage.

Photo by Michele Blackwell on Unsplash

“The only advice I can give to aspiring writers is don’t do it unless you’re willing to give your whole life to it. Red wine and garlic also help.”
Jim Harrison

When I was five years old, my grandma told me that garlic makes you live 100 years or more. Fascinated by that idea, I stole raw a garlic from our kitchen and tried to eat it like was an apple. I stopped after the second clove…

Eating garlic in raw cloves of garlic might not be the best idea, but garlic is a “superfood” that can do wonders for your health.

Garlic (Allium sativum) is part of the onion family that also includes shallots, leek, or chive.

In Chinese Medicine, garlic was mentioned as early as 2000 B.C as a cure for poisoning, and in the medieval age, it was recommended to treat many conditions including arthritis, infectious diseases, toothache or snake bites.

Some sources say that the builders of the Egyptian pyramids ate garlic to improve their endurance and strength.

What can garlic do for YOU? Let’s have a look at its ingredients and some of its major health benefits:

Garlic contains many vitamins and minerals such as:

  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Calcium
  • Copper
  • Potassium
  • Iron
  • Phosphorus
  • Folate
  • Selenium
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B2
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin B5
  • Vitamin E

That makes it a nutrition powerhouse while only having 148.9 Calories per 100 grams.

The health benefits of garlic

Next to the above-mentioned nutrients, garlic also contains phytochemicals (antioxidants) that can help to prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is linked to the development of various health conditions, including cancer, infections, cardiovascular diseases, depression, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and more.

Another component called sulfhydryl can help to bind and excrete toxic metals. According to Phyllis A. Balch, CNC and the author of “Prescription for Nutritional Healing”, garlic also prevents fats from being deposited in your arteries, which can lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Recent studies suggest that the regular consumption of garlic can even help to prevent certain types of cancer.*

According to studies aged garlic shows an even higher concentration of antioxidants and can help to prevent liver damage and lower blood pressure.

How can you add more garlic to your life?

Garlic adds flavor to almost any dish and can be also used for salad dressings, as topping for bread (Nisha Srivastava) by or sauteing.

I personally love eating Kimchi — THE most famous (and healthy) side dish.

You can also use garlic supplements, but please consult with your doctor before taking them as they can have side effects or interact with drugs.

Photo by Caglar Araz on Unsplash

Everything good is found in ginger
Indian Proverb

Ginger has been used in traditional Asian medicine for centuries and belongs to the same spice family as turmeric, cardamom, and galangal.

It contains many healthy nutrients such as

  • Amino acids,
  • Calcium
  • Essential fatty acids
  • Iron
  • Manganese
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphorus
  • Zinc
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B2
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin C

Health benefits of ginger

According to a study published in the International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, ginger can help to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease inflammation in patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

Other studies have shown that the consumption of ginger (tea) can help to decrease muscle pain and prevent migraines.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), ginger is used to treat atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, nausea, headaches, and colds.

In India, ginger is called “Vishwabheshaja” (the universal medicine) and is used for digestive, respiratory, and circulatory disorders.

How can you add more ginger to your life?

Next to adding ginger to dishes, you can add ginger to smoothies. In Japan, ginger is to cleanse the palate between eating different kinds of sushi.

I also love to drink ginger tea or to mix it in my daily “green drink.”

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In good health,
Rike

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