The White House is now predicting 100,000 to 240,000 deaths in the U.S. in the next two weeks from the coronavirus pandemic, even if current social distancing guidelines are maintained, President Donald Trump announced Tuesday. Staying at home and keeping away from others could still help, officials say, but hospitals’ efforts to prepare for an onslaught of patients could also make a difference. And while Washington, so far, has received 500 ventilators from Strategic National Stockpile, it may not get all the gear it requested from the federal government’s national stockpile of medical supplies.

Another recent hurdle Washington is facing is a technical issue in the state Department of Health’s data collection system, resulting in lags in reporting new coronavirus cases and deaths. The department said Tuesday the program it’s using has been overwhelmed by the increasing number of test results. Washington’s most recent data update posted to the DOH website came from lab results reported four days earlier — as of midnight March 28, when it announced 586 new cases, bringing the state total to 4,896. The state’s confirmed death toll rose to 195.

Throughout today, on this page, we’ll be posting updates from Seattle Times journalists and others on the outbreak and its effects on the Seattle area, the Pacific Northwest and the world. Updates from Tuesday can be found here, and all our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

The following graphic includes the most recent numbers from the Washington State Department of Health, released Sunday night.

Live updates:

Here’s help

How to get your government stimulus check: They’ll arrive automatically for some people, but others — including senior citizens and low-income people who might not traditionally file tax returns — need to take action.

Small business owners, too, can get help under the federal relief package. Here’s who qualifies and how to apply for a loan.

Disinfect your car before you put those hands on the steering wheel. The right disinfectants, applied in the right places (not just the obvious ones), can kill the coronavirus.

—Kris Higginson

Limited testing leaves senior care facilities ‘flying in the dark’

https://www.seattletimes.com/Careage of Whidbey administrator Sean O’Neill, on his way to take COVID-19 tests to a lab, stands on the road leading into the Coupeville center with a biohazard bag. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)
Careage of Whidbey administrator Sean O’Neill, on his way to take COVID-19 tests to a lab, stands on the road leading into the Coupeville center with a biohazard bag. (Mike Siegel / The Seattle Times)

Careage of Whidbey discovered a widespread outbreak — at least 27 residents and 20 employees — because, unlike other nursing homes, it tested everyone there.

As nursing home residents’ families raise concerns about a lack of testing, a Seattle Times analysis identified at least 90 facilities in the state with outbreaks, and more than 500 cases among their residents and employees.

Read the Times Watchdog story.

—Kris Higginson

Catch up on the past 24 hours

—Kris Higginson

How is this outbreak affecting you?

What has changed about your daily life? What kinds of discussions are you having with family members and friends? Are you a health care worker who’s on the front lines of the response? Are you a COVID-19 patient or do you know one? Whoever you are, we want to hear from you so our news coverage is as complete, accurate and useful as possible. If you’re using a mobile device and can’t see the form on this page, click here.

Do you have questions about the novel coronavirus?

Ask your question in the form below and we’ll dig for answers. If you’re using a mobile device and can’t see the form on this page, ask your question here.

You can see questions we’ve already answered on this FAQ.

If you have specific medical questions, please contact your doctor.



Source link